Our people

Dr Regan Fu

Dr Regan Fu received his PhD in Biomedical Science from the University of Auckland under the supervision of Associate Professor Adam Patterson, Associate Professor Jeff Smaill and Professor Ian Hermans. His thesis focused on combining immunotherapy with novel hypoxia-activated prodrugs, to improve immunotherapy effectiveness against solid tumours. Regan is currently working as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Malaghan Institute of Medical Research as part of Professor Ian Herman's cancer immunotherapy programme and have ongoing collaboration with the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre (ACSRC).


Research interests

My research interests are tumour hypoxia and cancer immunotherapy. Despite recent clinical successes and approval of numerous checkpoint blockades, the objective response rate as a single therapy associated with such treatment is only around 10-40% across different tumour types. This indicates the presence of underlying mechanisms of resistance which limits the development of a long-term immunity against tumours and the necessity to overcome antagonism within the tumour microenvironment to elicit a robust anti-tumour immune response.

 

 

Research group

Cancer Immunotherapy Programme
Cancer Immunotherapy Programme Leader: Professor Ian Hermans
Senior Research Fellow: Dr Olivier Gasser
Clinical Research Fellow: Dr Robert Weinkove
Team Leader: Dr Rachel Perret
Postdoctoral Research Fellows: Dr Patricial Rubio-Reyes
Dr Regan Fu
Dr Nathaniel Dasyam
Senior Research Officers: Connie Gilfillan
Astrid Authier-Hall
Kathryn Farrand
Ching-Wen Tang
Research Officers: Michael Wilson
Olga Palmer
Tia Haira
Anna Mooney
Sophia Noble
PhD Students: Jarem Wylie
Yasmin Nouri
Ellie-May Jarvis

Research projects

My current project involves investigating the combinatorial interaction between novel hypoxia-activated prodrugs and checkpoint inhibitors using various syngeneic murine cancer models, and to understand the mechanisms behind the improved anti-tumour activity through mechanistic studies.