Scope 40 - From theory to therapy

16 October 2009

Over the past decade the Malaghan Institute has become increasingly focused on translating our basic biomedical research into real results for patients. The process required to turn a novel theory into a therapy that is practiced in the clinic however, is not trivial.  Scientific breakthroughs cannot be forced or even predicted, as exemplified by the "accidental" discovery of penicillin by Alexander Fleming in 1928, which went on to revolutionise modern medicine.    

The Malaghan Institute is recognised internationally as a leading immunology research Institute and we are proud of our excellent track record for taking our bench work science into the clinic.  Like Fleming, our scientists are skilled at recognising the potential of unexpected findings and this has played a critical role in shaping how we do things. 

As a result of recent developments in our cutting-edge basic research programmes, we have been able to expand and diversify our clinical work and are proud to update you on these initiatives in this issue of Scope.